Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (2022)

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (1)

Just like humans, cats can come into contact with toxic substances that are hazardous to their health.

Cats encounter poisonous substances by swallowing them, chewing on them, inhaling them, or coming into physical contact by brushing against or walking through them. When dealing with suspected poisoning in cats, it is important to recognize the signs of poisoning and know what to do if you see them.

Quick Overview: Poisoning In Cats

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (2)Common Symptoms: Vomiting, drooling, difficulty breathing, tremors, seizures, poor appetite, lethargy, drinking and urinating excessively.

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (3)Diagnosis: History of toxin ingestion or application, bloodwork, urinalysis.

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (4)Diagnosed in Cats: Moderately often

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (5)Requires Ongoing Medication: No

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (6)Vaccine Available: No

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (7)Treatment Options: Depends on the toxin. Ingested toxins may need inudction of vomiting, activated charcoal to bind a toxin, and intravenous fluid therapy. Topical toxins may also require bathing to remove the substance. Some specific medications are needed to counteract the effects of certain toxins.

(Video) Dog & Cat Diseases : Cat Poisoning Symptoms

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (8)Home Remedies: Bathing wtih dishsoap if something topical was applied. Immediate veterinary care is best for any ingested toxin as most have time limitations for treatment.

What Causes Poisoning In Cats?

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (9)

Many substances can cause poisoning in cats. Some of the most common causes of cat poisoning include:

  • Poisonous plants such as lilies (day, tiger, japanese show), tulips, and rhododendrons, azaleas
  • Ingesting or physical contact with common household products like bleach, disinfectants, and other cleaning products, antifreeze, insecticides, pesticides, and rodenticides (rat poison)
  • Common drugs like Ibuprofen, acetaminophen (also called paracetamol), antidepressants, cannabis products, and over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers
  • Topical insecticides designed to kill fleas and ticks and all products containing permethrin
  • Ingestion of human foods, especially anything that contains xylitol, garlic, onions, alcohol, chocolate, black tea, coffee, excessive levels of fat, raw fish, grapes, and raisins, or any other dried fruit

Also Read:What Can Cats Eat? 36 Human Foods Cats Can Eat – and 8 They Can’t!

Poisoning in cats is a serious problem.

While poisoning in cats is no more common than poisoning in dogs, it can often result in more severe symptoms.

This is due to several factors, including:

  • Their relatively small size. Even small doses of toxins can be poisonous in small animals. Kittens are at even higher risk because they are so small.
  • Cats metabolize chemicals differently than dogs, which can make it more difficult or even impossible to eliminate the toxic substance from their body.
  • Many cats live unsupervised and outdoors, where they can come into contact with toxic substances. Many pet parents don’t even realize their cat has been poisoned because they didn’t see their cat come into contact with the toxic substance.
  • Cats lick themselves to groom, and accidentally ingesting a substance while grooming is a common cause of poisoning in cats.

Symptoms Of Poisoning In Cats

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (10)

The symptoms of poisoning in cats differ depending on the substance that caused the poisoning, but there are a few key signs to look for.

The signs of poisoning in cats vary dramatically depending on what toxin the cat has been exposed to, the overall health of the cat, how the cat was exposed (ingestion, inhalation, etc.), how long ago the exposure happened, and the amount of poison exposed to the cat.

(Video) How to Treat a Poisoned Cat || How to treat a poisoned cat at home

Cats are masters at hiding illness, and in mild cases, you may not notice any symptoms at all. Poisoning affects the whole body, but the most common body systems affected include the gastrointestinal system, the skin, the kidneys, the liver, and the nervous system.

Typically, if signs of poisoning are going to show up they tend to occur all of a sudden, i.e. the cat was fine and now he is not, however, in some cases, the response can be delayed 24 hours or longer.

The most common signs of poisoning in cats include:

  • Vomiting
  • Drooling
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lethargy or weakness, wobbly gait
  • Unresponsive
  • Tremors, seizures, or twitching
  • Appetite loss
  • Drinking more than normal or excessive urination
  • Red or raw skin or paw pads due to a chemical burn
  • Bloody vomit, saliva, and/or stools
  • Pale gums
  • Excessive sneezing
  • Hiding or decreased social behavior
  • Yellowish tint to skin and whites of eyes (jaundice)
  • Racing heartrate or excessively slow heartrate (resting normal heartrate in cats is 130-150 beats per minute)

What Should I Do If I Suspect My Cat Has Been Poisoned?

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (11)

As soon as you suspect that your cat may have been poisoned, immediately contact a veterinarian or emergency veterinary hospital.

If you suspect that your cat has been poisoned do not wait: call your local veterinarian during normal business hours or your local emergency veterinary hospital.

Many people will wait until their cat shows signs of sickness, but if you know your cat has been exposed to a toxin, or if your cat is showing any signs of poisoning, the best thing you can do is call your vet immediately.

Also Read:Plants Poisonous to Cats: Toxic Plants to Avoid

The reason for this is your vet may be able to safely remove the toxic substance from your cat’s body, thus avoiding the signs of poisoning altogether. If you don’t have access to a local veterinarian, call the pet poison helpline or your local poison control.

If you know what your cat has been exposed to, bring a sample of it or a picture of it with you to the vet. Make sure to include the ingredient label if applicable. This is important because it will give your vet the information she needs to possibly save your cat’s life.

(Video) Lily Poisoning in cats

Even if you have googled and know how to induce vomiting in your cat, never induce vomiting in a cat without the supervision of a veterinarian or poison expert, either in person or over the phone. Some substances, such as bleach, can burn the esophagus in a cat that has been induced to vomit, and inducing vomiting is not the right choice in all cases of poisoning.

Can Cats Recover From The Signs Of Poisoning?

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (12)

With the right treatment, most cats can recover from poisoning and go on to lead healthy lives.

In most cases, cats can recover without incident from poisoning and go on to live long, normal, healthy lives. In other cases, such as cats that develop kidney failure from ingesting lilies or ethylene glycol in antifreeze, there may be permanent damage to internal organs from the poisoning.

If your cat ever comes into contact with a poison, seeking prompt veterinary attention is your best bet and helping your cat recover quickly without long-term problems.

How To Prevent Poisoning In Cats

Poisoning In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - All About Cats (13)

The best medicine is preventive medicine. Here are some tips on how to keep your cat safe:

  • Keep your cat indoors. If your cat likes the outdoors, take your cat out on a leash or keep your cat secured in a safe space, like a Catio.
  • Make sure your cat is protected from toxic substances by keeping all potentially toxic substances in your home, including chemical, insecticides, pesticides, locked away out of reach of animals.
  • Check your yard for toxic plants, and bar your cat’s access to these plants.
  • Keep all over-the-counter and prescription medicine and supplements in a closed cabinet.
  • Avoid using over-the-counter flea treatments, flea collars, and sprays that contain permethrins on your cat. Permethrins are extremely toxic to cats.

By educating yourself about what is not safe for your cat, and making mindful changes in your environment to keep your cat away from these substances, you and will protect your cat from accidental poisoning. Who knows – you may even save a friend’s cat’s life as well.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if my cat has been poisoned?

The signs of poisoning in cats vary dramatically depending on what toxin the cat has been exposed to, the overall health of the cat, how the cat was exposed (ingestion, inhalation, etc.), how long ago the exposure happened, and the amount of poison ingested or otherwise exposed. Cats are masters at hiding illness, and in mild cases, you may not notice any symptoms at all. Poisoning affects the whole body, but the most common body systems affected include the gastrointestinal system, the skin, the kidneys, the liver, and the neurological system.

Typically, if signs of poisoning are going to show up they tend to occur all of a sudden, i.e. the cat was fine and now he is not, however, in some cases, the response can be delayed 24 hours or longer. The most common signs of poisoning in cats include:

  • Vomiting
  • Drooling
  • Diarrhoea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lethargy or weakness, wobbly gait
  • Unresponsive
  • Tremors, seizures, or twitching
  • Appetite loss
  • Drinking more than normal or excessive urination
  • Red or raw skin or paw pads due to a chemical burn
  • Bloody vomit, saliva, and/or stools
  • Pale gums
  • Excessive sneezing
  • Hiding or decreased social behavior
  • Yellowish tint to skin and whites of eyes (jaundice)
  • Racing heartrate or excessively slow heartrate (resting normal heartrate in cats is 130-150 beats per minute)

If you notice any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian, a veterinary emergency clinic, or if neither are available, the ASPCA 24 hour poison hotline.

(Video) Poisoning in cats | Cat care advice

Can cats recover from poisoning on their own?

Whether or not a cat can recover from poisoning without veterinary treatment depends on the overall health of the cat, the amount of toxic substance the the cat was exposed to, and the type of poison. Most of the time, it is still a very good idea to call your vet for advice. If your cat is showing any signs of poisoning, then call your vet immediately.

How do you save a poisoned cat?

The best thing to do if your suspect your cat has been poisoned is to call your local veterinarian, a local veterinary emergency clinic, or the pet poison hotline at (888) 426-4435 immediately.

Make sure your cat is in a safe place, and remove any access to toxins. Save the toxic substance or make a note of what you think your cat was exposed to so that you can relay that information to your veterinarian.

Do not induce vomiting or start any other at home medical treatment in your cat without the supervision of a veterinarian.

(Video) LOOK HOW TO TREAT A POISONED CAT

FAQs

What causes poisoning in cats? ›

Some cold relievers, antidepressants, dietary supplements, and pain relievers—most notably such commonly used substances as aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol®), and ibuprofen are a common cause of feline poisoning.

What are the signs of poisoning in a cat? ›

Here are some of the most common signs that your cat has been poisoned:
  • Salivation / Drooling.
  • Coughing.
  • Diarrhea and Vomiting.
  • Twitching or seizure.
  • Breathing difficulties (rapid or labored)
30 Oct 2021

How do you treat cat poisoning? ›

Immediately call your veterinarian, an animal hospital, or the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-213-6680. Identify the poison. If possible, identify the substance that caused the poisoning and give that information to the veterinarian over the phone. Bring the poison to the veterinarian.

Can poisoning in cats be treated? ›

25% of poisoned pets recover within two hours. Of the pets that take longer to recover, many can be treated at home with the advice of your veterinarian or with advice from the ASPCA Poison Control Center (telephone 1-888-426-4435). Even with treatment, one in 100 poisoned pets dies.

How long does it take for a cat to show symptoms of poisoning? ›

Once a cat ingests or comes in contact with a toxin, symptoms may not show up right away. Some toxins may take 3 to 4 days to show any effects.

Can cats recover from poisoning on their own? ›

In most cases, cats can recover without incident from poisoning and go on to live long, normal, healthy lives. In other cases, such as cats that develop kidney failure from ingesting lilies or ethylene glycol in antifreeze, there may be permanent damage to internal organs from the poisoning.

What happens when cat is poisoned? ›

Signs & Symptoms of Poisoning in Cats

Vomiting. Diarrhoea. Twitching or seizure. Breathing difficulties (rapid or labored)

How long does cat poisoning last? ›

Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals. Hello the side effects can last 24 to 48 hours. If your cat is not eating it would be best for your vet to see your cat.

What is the first aid for cat poisoning? ›

Symptoms include vomiting, dizziness, salivation, anorexia, diarrhea and depression. As first aid, give your cat milk or milk and water to drink with a syringe, slowly and letting it swallow by itself. The milk will become linked to the chlorine and prevent further damage.

Does milk help with cat poisoning? ›

No. Milk is unlikely to be helpful in the vast majority of poisoning situations and can sometimes make things worse. Most pets are lactose intolerant and giving milk can cause or worsen stomach upset symptoms.

Is Egg good for poisoned cat? ›

In less severe cases of poisoning, give the cat milk, egg whites or vegetable oil. If you use oil, administer approximately two teaspoons for an average-sized cat. The best way to feed the cat with oil is to add it to food, if the cat is still capable of eating anything.

Can cats get food poisoning? ›

Various substances can lead to food poisoning in felines, but it is usually caused by harmful bacteria found in raw or spoiled meat. The most frequent foodborne illnesses in cats are: Salmonellosis. Botulism.

How long does food poisoning last? ›

Symptoms of food poisoning can appear anywhere between four hours and one week after ingesting a contaminated food item, and can persist for as short a time as 24 hours or as long as a week.

How much does it cost to treat a poisoned cat? ›

Average Cost of Treatment

Treatment for cat poisoning from human medications can cost between $250-$2,000.

How do you treat a cat with essential oil poisoning? ›

What should I do if I suspect that my cat has been exposed to essential oils or liquid potpourri?
  1. Do not induce vomiting or give activated charcoal to your cat. ...
  2. Put the product packaging in a sealed container and take it with you to the veterinary clinic.

Is cat poisonous to humans? ›

Cats can transmit Toxoplasma to people through their feces, but humans most commonly become infected by eating undercooked or raw meat, or by inadvertently consuming contaminated soil on unwashed or undercooked vegetables. The symptoms of toxoplasmosis include flu-like muscle aches and fever, and headache.

How do you treat permethrin poisoning in cats at home? ›

The most common treatments for permethrin poisoning are:

Decontamination consists of bathing the cat in warm water. Using a mild detergent, the vet will remove as much of the product as possible to prevent further absorption through the skin. Induced vomiting: This will help if your cat has ingested the poison.

How do you give a cat first aid? ›

Cat Unconscious: What to Do | First Aid for Pets - YouTube

Can a cat be poisoned by eating a poisoned rat? ›

Relay toxicosis, where a cat eats a rodent that has consumed bait, can occur. Cats that eat multiple rodents over time could be at higher risk for toxicity because the toxin can build up in tissues. Anticoagulant and vitamin D3 poisons are stored in the liver of the rodent that ingests them.

What is poisonous to cats and dogs? ›

Cocoa mulch. Fabric softener sheets. Ice melting products. Insecticides and pesticides (even flea and tick products for dogs can be dangerous, or possibly life-threatening, if used on cats or other animals)

How long does food poisoning last in cats? ›

What is the prognosis (expected outcome) for gastroenteritis? Most cases of acute gastroenteritis improve rapidly after rehydration. If the vomiting and diarrhea do not improve significantly within 24-48 hours of treatment, call your veterinarian. Gastroenteritis is common in cats.

What are the symptoms of being slowly poisoned? ›

General symptoms of poisoning can include:
  • feeling and being sick.
  • diarrhoea.
  • stomach pain.
  • drowsiness, dizziness or weakness.
  • high temperature.
  • chills (shivering)
  • loss of appetite.
  • headache.

What is the first aid for cat poisoning? ›

Symptoms include vomiting, dizziness, salivation, anorexia, diarrhea and depression. As first aid, give your cat milk or milk and water to drink with a syringe, slowly and letting it swallow by itself. The milk will become linked to the chlorine and prevent further damage.

Can a cat be poisoned by eating a poisoned rat? ›

Relay toxicosis, where a cat eats a rodent that has consumed bait, can occur. Cats that eat multiple rodents over time could be at higher risk for toxicity because the toxin can build up in tissues. Anticoagulant and vitamin D3 poisons are stored in the liver of the rodent that ingests them.

Will milk help a poisoned cat? ›

No. Milk is unlikely to be helpful in the vast majority of poisoning situations and can sometimes make things worse. Most pets are lactose intolerant and giving milk can cause or worsen stomach upset symptoms.

What happens to a cat with food poisoning? ›

If your cat has ingested a toxin, you may see: GI issues like vomiting and diarrhea. Wheezing or difficulty breathing. Lethargy or weakness.

Videos

1. Diarrhea in Cats: Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment
(All About Cats)
2. Symptoms of Poisoning in Cats | Wag!
(Wag! Dog Walking)
3. How do you treat lily poisoning in cats?
(Ask About MOVIES)
4. Cat food poisoning | Sign, symptoms, treatment and diagnosis of cat poisoning| Dr Murtaza Khalil
(Animals Knowledge)
5. Is Lily poisonous for cat? lily toxicity symptoms and treatment
(Learn with Hafiz Waqar)
6. Flea and tick (Pyrethrin/Pyrethroid) Poisoning in Cats | Dr. Justine Lee
(Dr. Justine Lee, DACVECC, DABT)

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